How I make sure my photos are backed up properly.

May 13, 2013

I had a hard drive fail on me once. It was a total nightmare. I lost two years of digital photos and all of my music that i’d digitised.

NEVER AGAIN!

Thankfully this happened to me before I was a professional photographer and it was just my own images. Not a wedding clients. If you charge people for your photography, you need to be professional and have a proper bomb proof backup strategy.

There is a famous saying that ‘data doesn’t exist unless it’s in three different places and two different locations’. Read that again. It’s very important to get that into your head.

So sometime last year I took a good hard look at my back up strategy and decided that I wanted to improve it and future proof my workflow. I asked a load of people, I read articles, I did a lot of homework on this subject. Now following on from a conversation on Facebook, i’m gonna share with you how I back up. It may be overkill, but I’m pretty certain that i’m covered should something go wrong.

So lets start at the beginning:

Drobo

To put this simply without too much technical jargon, this is an external hard drive with a difference. Its the mother of all external hard drives. It’s basically a big black box, which is the housing, that can hold a number of hard drives.

The data in a Drobo is stored across all the hard drives in the housing (in a RAID system). So my Drobo houses five of them. If one hard drive in there fails, the drobo will move the data across the remaining four. This allows me to replace the failed one and when the new hard drive is placed in there, the data gets written back across all five again. This is a great backup strategy as the data is safer than if it were in a standalone hard drive which if that fails, its gone.

The other good thing is that as I need more storage space, I can swap out the hard drives in there for bigger ones. I think I have five X 2TB drives in there at the moment. But in a few years I may need to change them for 4TB drives, and I can easily do this.

The only downside of a Drobo is the expense, as you need to pay for the Drobo itself and also the hard drives separately. You are also limited to using Drobos in the future as I believe that it uses it’s own code thingy (i’m not that geeky) that isn’t compatible with other types of storage drives. But I didn’t mind these two downsides, as 1. I earn a living through photography and need to be covered and 2. I liked the Drobo system and it’s used by a lot of photographers, so I hope it’s gonna be the market leader for a long time.

http://www.drobo.co.uk/

External Hard drives

I also have separate external hard drives, which house back ups of the finished images, my documents etc.

The main two that I use, i’ve called HD3 & HD4 (when these get full, i’ll get two more and call them HD 5 & HD6). They both have duplicate backups on there of all my important information.

These are failsafes as my info is in three places in my office.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/external_harddrives

Time Machine

This is my Mac’s backup utility and is included with my Mac’s OS. Time Machine makes incremental backups of files that can be restored at a later date. It allows me to restore the whole system or specific files. If i’m honest I don’t totally understand Time Machine, but I know that it copies my Mac’s Hard Drive and if I need something that I’ve been working on there I can go back to where I store my Time Machine backups and retrieve something. I use my HD3 to store the Time Machine backups and this backs up every so often and writes over old backups, so it just does it in the background without me having to worry.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_Machine_(Mac_OS)

BackBlaze

So now we go into the off-site / online storage. What happens if (please let this never happen) my house burns down and the Drobo and other external hard drives are lost in the fire?

I need some kind of off-site / online  storage solution and after asking around quite a few professional photographers, I settled on BackBlaze.

“Backblaze is an online backup tool that allows Windows and Mac OS X users to backup their data to an offsite data center. The service is designed for end-users, providing unlimited storage space and supporting unlimited file sizes. It allows the user to backup data continuously, manually, when the computer is idle, or on an hourly schedule.”

How good is that. A total off-site / online storage solution and it only costs around $5 a month. This works in the background as well and I don’t really notice it.

There was only one time in the last six months that i’ve needed to retrieve a file and I ended up going to BackBlaze and it was easy to get it back. This service just gives me peace of mind.

http://www.backblaze.com

 

 

 

 

My Online Client Gallery

For my wedding clients I use an online gallery service called Zenfolio. Others are available, but this is who I use. I upload all the high res images to the gallery, for clients to view and print should they need to.

This also gives me a belt and braces option, as I can always download the images from there myself and I take comfort knowing that my final files are stored in two places off-site / online.

http://vivaweddingphotography.zenfolio.com

 

 

My Contracts

To cover myself yet again. In my contacts it states that, it is the clients responsibility for ensuring that the high-resolution digital files are safely stored upon delivery and that I’m under no obligation to store them and that I recommend that the client stores them in at least two different places.

That may be a bit harsh, but I’m covered for all eventualities and I will always try to keep copies of clients files, but you never know what may happen.

—–

So thats about it in regards to different storage solutions. It may seem like a lot of hassle and work, but as a professional photographer it’s just part of the job. I think this is what clients are paying me for and it’s what sets me apart from the weekender / hobbyist photographer who charges next to nothing for their work. Making sure your files are safe, is all part of the job.

Workflow

I suppose that I should talk though workflow really, so that you get how all this goes together.

Ok so I’ve done my shoot. My camera has two card slots, one for the Compact Flash card and one for a Secure Digital card. I had a couple of cards fail on me once after shooting a wedding. I’ll probably write a blog post about that and what to do when that happens (it will happen to you) at some point.

I use the Compact Flash card to write the RAW files in camera and the Secure Digital card to write high quality back up JPEG files. I love that I’m already backing up in camera as I shoot.

So when I upload the RAW files from the cards to Lightroom, they go straight to a folder on my Drobo and I check the box to make a second copy of the RAW’s to my external hard drive HD4 (when I have the finished images, i’ll delete the second copy of the RAWs on HD4 when I remember). This way the RAW files are in two places in my office and still on the Compact Flash cards. Sometimes I won’t erase the cards until i’ve worked on the final images. Sometimes I have a shoot the next day and I have to use the cards, but at least I know that I have two copies of the RAW files, at this point.

Once I’ve finished editing and exported the final JPEGs to the final folder on my Drobo. I’ll make a copy of them to HD3 & HD4. BackBlaze is also working its magic in the background and in the case of wedding photography I’ll upload the images to my Online gallery. As well as burning a disc for the client.

So the final images are stored in three places in my office. One of them on the Drobo that will write the data across different hard drives should one fail. They are also stored in two different off site / online places as well. So that’s five different places and two different locations.

 

Can you say that your data is that safe?

 

 

 

 

Find me on Google+

4 comments

  1. All good advice. My system is pretty much the same, except I use Crashplan (http://www.crashplan.com) for the cloud back-ups. Anyone reading this thinking, “I ought to do something like this” – do it now, as you’ll only kick yourself even harder if you haven’t sorted it by the time something fails… and like Adam says, it will.

    Comment by James Hedley on May 13, 2013 at 8:08 am

  2. Thanks Adam, it’s always handy to know what others are doing and look to improve all systems. I pretty have this same system in place except that I use multiple Rugged external drives rather than a Drobo. I also take one hard-drive out to the glove box of my car as soon as I’ve done the double-back up of RAW files so that my RAW files are in at least two locations in between shooting the job and editing the photos. Again, please don’t let me car be stolen or my house burn down … at least I guess the it’s even less likely for both to happen!

    Comment by Sarah Falugo on May 13, 2013 at 8:36 am

  3. thanks a lot Adam for this crystal clear in a nutshell advice! And for reminding me to reposition some “to do’s” on the top of the neverending to do list …

    Comment by karin on May 14, 2013 at 7:14 am

  4. My system is better for several reasons. I have a HD off-site in a fireproof safe deposit box at my bank. Your backups are manual but mine uses SuperDuper! Automatic not manual like you. Daily to one HD and weekly to another. I also have SugarSync running constantly. You don’t understand Time Machine (it’s a gimmick in my opinion) so a false sense of security. You don’t seem to be making BOOTABLE backups of you HD or main Mac startup drive. Otherwise your setup is complex and really expensive but at least you have something in place – most people do not.

    Comment by Steve on May 18, 2013 at 6:07 am

Trackbacks

  1. How I Make Sure My Photos Are Backed Up and Safe From Harm

Allowed tags: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

By submitting a comment you grant Adam Bronkhorst a perpetual license to reproduce your words and name/web site in attribution. Inappropriate and irrelevant comments will be removed at an admin’s discretion. Your email is used for verification purposes only, it will never be shared.